What Will You Say?

Imagine you are walking down Tarpon Avenue on January 6th during the Epiphany Procession and a stranger stops you and asks, “What’s all the commotion? Who is the guy in the gold robes?” There you are with a few hundred of your fellow Greek Orthodox Christians, walking the same path so many hundreds have gone before for over one hundred years. Suddenly a homeless man calls out, “HELP!” Now imagine someone from the Church steps out from the procession pushing the homeless man back into the crowd so the Archbishop could walk without interruption.

A Close Bond

Today is the Feast of Saint Andrew the First-Called Apostle. Saint Andrew was called to follow Christ while he was still a disciple of John the Baptist. After Jesus called him, he immediately turned to his brother and said, “We have found the Messiah!” (You can read the entire passage below). Then Jesus called Philip who turned to his close friend. Over and over again the Good News of the Messiah spread not through strangers, but though people who had a close bond.

Why do you go to Church?

With the “holiday season” in full swing, each day our attention is being begged by many commercial vendors promising to sell love and happiness this year for Christmas. Then there is the ever-popular “KEEP CHRIST IN CHRISTMAS!” mantra that increases to a daily rage in the weeks leading up to Christmas. Through all this commercial chaos, the Church invites us to spend more time actually IN Church.

Be Better than Stones

When a group of religious elites attempted to silent the disciples of Christ because they were rejoicing and praising God, Christ said, “If these were silent, the very stones would cry out.” Take a moment and read today’s Gospel passage.

Be All You Should Be

There is a popular army slogan, “Be all you can be.” For more than twenty years, this slogan was used to recruit the finest men and women to join the United States Army. It strikes a chord in your heart that creates the desire to prove yourself to others, not just in your strength but by your attitude as well. The United States Army is known throughout the world for bravery and skill. But I’m not recruiting your to join the US Army.

Seeing in Front of Your Eyes

Today is Thanksgiving Day, a day officially established by President Abraham Lincoln to give thanks to God ever since the Civil War. As it is the only day in the American civil calendar set aside to expressly thank God, even the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America eases the Nativity Fast to allow for a ‘traditional’ turkey meal. Over the years the holiday has taken a nearly totally secular character with focus on football games and shopping sprees.

What are you willing to leave behind?

Tomorrow is Thanksgiving and most Americans will gather around banquet tables thankful for the overabundance of blessings in their lives. Many of those will forget their sense of gratitude by the time the sun rises on “Black Friday” which is the known to be the busiest retail sales day of the entire year. Many will forget they haven’t always had what they have today. We are called to much more as Orthodox Christians.

We Have Work to Do

In the Gospel According to St Luke we hear about a very successful farmer who also forgot the purpose of the blessings God had given to him. After experiencing a bumper crop he was faced with a decision since his harvest was so plentiful his barns were not big enough to store everything he had. “I will pull down my barns and build greater, and there I will store all my crops and my goods.

Love and Holy Communion

God calls us to love, but love can only be expressed in a relationship spending time together. This is why He came and live among us, so that we could know Him and live with Him. As Orthodox Christians we express that life in Holy Communion, through which we get to spend time with God, to know Him and to love Him.